The Best Writing Quotes From Capote, King, Lamott, Orwell and More

What is the most famous writing quote of all time? You get to decide! Here are the best quotes about writing and creativity from famous authors such as Truman Capote, Margaret Atwood, Annie Dillard, Anne Lamott, Stephen King, and Doris Lessing.

“I have the heart of a young boy,” said Stephen King. “I keep it in a jar on my desk.” That’ isn’t just one of my favorite writing quotes, it’s also a brilliant play on words. Here’s an even more startling image from famous author and script writer Truman Capote: “Finishing a book is just like you took a child out in the back yard and shot it.”

On a less startling note, I love what Doris Lessing was quoted as saying about succeeding as a writer: “What I did have, which others perhaps didn’t, was a capacity for sticking at it, which really is the point, not the talent at all. You have to stick at it.” Is a Writer’s Personality the Key to Getting Published?

28 famous authors are quoted in this post:

  1. Isabel Allende
  2. Margaret Atwood
  3. Truman Capote
  4. Anton Chekhov
  5. Joan Didion
  6. Annie Dillard
  7. George Eliot
  8. Zelda Fitzgerald
  9. Elizabeth Gilbert
  10. Natalie Goldberg
  11. Arthur Hailey
  12. Joseph Heller
  13. Ernest Hemingway
  14. John Irving
  15. Erica Jong
  16. Stephen King
  17. Anne Lamott
  18. Madeleine L’Engle
  19. Doris Lessing
  20. Philip Martin
  21. W. Somerset Maugham
  22. George Orwell
  23. Anne Tyler
  24. Mark Twain
  25. Jessamyn West
  26. E.B. White
  27. Walt Whitman
  28. Phyllis Whitney

Are you searching for the best or most famous writing quotes because you need motivation to write? Here’s an inspiring message from a teacher and bestselling author:

“Art is not about thinking something up,” writes Julia Cameron in How to Avoid Making Art (or Anything Else You Enjoy). “It is the opposite – getting something down.” This is more meaningful than it first appears. She is referring to the creative muse, Holy Spirit or universe writing through you.

 Best Writing Quotes From Capote, King, Lamott, Orwell
Writing Quotes and Tips

Best Writing Quotes From Capote, King, Lamott, Orwell, and More

“Writing is a solitary occupation. Family, friends, and society are the natural enemies of the writer. He must be alone, uninterrupted, and slightly savage if he is to sustain and complete an undertaking.” ~ Jessamyn West.

On creative writing (tips from Chekhov, Lamott, Whitman)

“Don’t tell me the moon is shining; show me the glint of light on broken glass.” ~ Anton Chekhov.

“Perfectionism is the voice of the oppressor, the enemy of the people. It will keep you insane your whole life,” ~ Anne Lamott in Bird By Bird – Some Instructions On Writing And Life.

“The secret of it all, is to write in the gush, the throb, the flood, of the moment – to put things down without deliberation – without worrying about their style – without waiting for a fit time or place. I always worked that way. I took the first scrap of paper, the first doorstep, the first desk, and wrote – wrote, wrote…By writing at the instant the very heartbeat of life is caught.” ~ Walt Whitman.

On the craft of writing (advice from Didion, Irving, Whitney)

“What’s so hard about the first sentence is that you’re stuck with it. Everything else is going to flow out of that sentence. And by the time you’ve laid down the first two sentences, your options are all gone.” ~ Joan Didion.

“I always begin with a character, or characters, and then try to think up as much action for them as possible.” ~ John Irving.

“You must want to enough. Enough to take all the rejections, enough to pay the price in disappointment and discouragement while you are learning. Like any other artist you must learn your craft – then you can add all the genius you like.” – Phyllis Whitney.

On being a writer (secrets from Dillard, Goldberg, Irving, Maugham)

“Let the grass die. I let almost all of my indoor plants die from neglect while I was writing the book. There are all kinds of ways to live. You can take your choice. You can keep a tidy house, and when St. Peter asks you what you did with your life, you can say, I kept a tidy house, I made my own cheese balls.” ~ Annie Dillard.

“We have to accept ourselves in order to write. Now none of us does that fully: few of us do it even halfway. Don’t wait for one hundred percent acceptance of yourself before you write, or even eight percent acceptance. Just write. The process of writing is an activity that teaches us about acceptance” ~ Natalie Goldberg in Writing Down the Bones: Freeing the Writer Within.

how to write when you have no ideas

“If you care about something you have to protect it. If you’re lucky enough to find a way of life you love, you have to find the courage to live it.” ~ John Irving in A Prayer for Owen Meany.

“One of the amusements of being old is that I have no illusions about my literary position…I no longer mind what people think.” ~ W. Somerset Maugham.

On writer’s block (quotes from Hemingway, Jong, L’Engle, Updike, White)

“The best way is always to stop when you are going good and when you know what will happen next. If you do that every day when you’re rewriting a novel you will never be stuck.” ~ Ernest Hemingway.

“All writing problems are psychological problems. Blocks usually stem from the fear of being judged,” said Jong. “If you imagine the world listening, you’ll never write a line. That’s why privacy is so important. You should write first drafts as if they will never be shown to anyone.” ~ Erica Jong.

“I got so discouraged, I almost stopped writing. It was my 12-year-old son who changed my mind when he said to me, ‘Mother, you’ve been very cross and edgy with us and we notice you haven’t been writing. We wish you’d go back to the typewriter.’ That did a lot of good for my false guilts about spending so much time writing. At that point, I acknowledged that I am a writer and even if I were never published again, that’s what I am.” ~ Madeleine L’Engle.

“A few places are especially conducive to inspiration – automobiles, church – public places. I plotted Couples almost entirely in church – little shivers and urgencies I would note down on the program, and carry down to the office Monday.” ~ John Updike.

“A writer who waits for ideal conditions under which to work will die without putting a word on paper.” ~ E.B. White.

On the writing process (tips from Atwood, Capote, Didion, Ephron, Malamud, Whitman)

“The fact is that blank pages inspire me with terror. What will I put on them? Will it be good enough? Will I have to throw it out?” ~ Margaret Atwood.

“No one will ever know what writing In Cold Blood took out of me. It scraped me right down to the marrow of my bones. It nearly killed me. I think, in a way, it did kill me.” ~ Truman Capote.

“My writing is a process of rewriting, of going back and changing and filling in. In the rewriting process you discover what’s going on, and you go back and bring it up to that point. Sometimes you’ll just push through, indicate a scene or a character, leave a space, then go back later and fill it in.” ~ Joan Didion.

“I don’t write a word of the article until I have the lead. It just sets the whole tone – the whole point of view. I know exactly where I’m going as soon as I have the lead,” ~ Nora Ephron.

“I write a book or a short story three times. Once to understand her, the second time to improve her prose, and a third to compel her to say what she must.” ~ Bernard Malamud.

“The secret of it all, is to write in the gush, the throb, the flood, of the moment – to put things down without deliberation – without worrying about their style – without waiting for a fit time or place. I always worked that way. I took the first scrap of paper, the first doorstep, the first desk, and wrote – wrote, wrote…By writing at the instant the very heartbeat of life is caught.” ~ Walt Whitman.

On a writer’s voice and style (secrets from Capote, Dillard, Tyler)

“What I am trying to achieve is a voice sitting by a fireplace telling you a story on a winter’s evening.” ~ Truman Capote.

“The novel is a game or joke shared between author and reader.” ~ Annie Dillard.

“For me, writing something down was the only road out…I hated childhood, and spent it sitting behind a book waiting for adulthood to arrive. When I ran out of books I made up my own. At night, when I couldn’t sleep, I made up stories in the dark.” ~ Anne Tyler.

On grammar and sentence structure (writing advice from Truman Capote)

“I think of myself as a stylist, and stylists can become notoriously obsessed with the placing of a comma, the weight of a semicolon.” ~ Truman Capote.

“Writing has laws of perspective, of light and shade just as painting does, or music. If you are born knowing them, fine. If not, learn them. Then rearrange the rules to suit yourself.” ~ Truman Capote.

On learning how to write (tips from Hemingway, Lamott, Martin, Tyler)

“Almost all good writing begins with terrible first efforts. You need to start somewhere. Start by getting something – anything – down on paper. What I’ve learned to do when I sit down to work on a sh*tty first draft is to quiet the voices in my head.” ~ Anne Lamott in Bird By Bird – Some Instructions On Writing And Life. (This may be the most famous writing quote of all time; Ernest Hemingway said it first).

Habits of Highly Effective Writers

“In the end, writing skills are mostly absorbed, not learned. Like learning to speak as a native speaker, learning to write well is not just learning a set of rules or techniques. It’s a huge, messy body of deep language, inspired by bits of readings, conversations, incidents; it’s affected by how you were taught and where you live and who you want to become. For every convention, there is another way that may work better. For every rule, there are mavericks who succeed by flaunting it. There is no right or wrong way to write, no ten easy steps.” ~ Philip Martin.

“For me, writing something down was the only road out…I hated childhood, and spent it sitting behind a book waiting for adulthood to arrive. When I ran out of books I made up my own. At night, when I couldn’t sleep, I made up stories in the dark.” ~ Anne Tyler.

On fear and discouragement (writing advice from Allende, Atwood, L’Engle, Twain)

“When I’m scared – and I’m always scared when I have to face an audience, when I have to read a review, when I publish a book…then, I think of my grandfather. My grandfather was this strong, tough Basque who would never bend….What would he do? Well, he would go ahead, close his eyes, and drive forward. You do it and the spirit that is within you….is there.” ~ Isabelle Allende.

“The fact is that blank pages inspire me with terror. What will I put on them? Will it be good enough? Will I have to throw it out?” ~ Margaret Atwood. How Do You Stop Doubting Yourself as a Writer?

“I got so discouraged, I almost stopped writing. It was my 12-year-old son who changed my mind when he said to me, ‘Mother, you’ve been very cross and edgy with us and we notice you haven’t been writing. We wish you’d go back to the typewriter.’ That did a lot of good for my false guilts about spending so much time writing. At that point, I acknowledged that I am a writer and even if I were never published again, that’s what I am.” ~ Madeleine L’Engle.

“Twenty years from now, you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do,” ~ Mark Twain.

On writing discipline (tips from Dillard, Gilbert, Hailey, Heller, Orwell)

“I don’t do housework. Life is too short and I’m too much of a Puritan. If you want to take a year off to write a book, you have to take that year, or the year will take you by the hair and pull you toward the grave.” ~ Annie Dillard.

“As for discipline – it’s important, but sort of over-rated. The more important virtue for a writer, I believe, is self-forgiveness. Because your writing will always disappoint you. Your laziness will always disappoint you.” ~ Elizabeth Gilbert.

“I set myself 600 words a day as a minimum output, regardless of the weather, my state of mind or if I’m sick or well. There must be 600 finished words – not almost right words. Before you ask, I’ll tell you that yes, I do write 600 at the top of my pad every day, and I keep track of the word count to insure I reach my quota daily – without fail.” ~ Arthur Hailey.

“Every writer I know has trouble writing.” ~ Joseph Heller.

“The way you define yourself as a writer is that you write every time you have a free minute. If you didn’t behave that way you would never do anything.” ~ John Irving.

“Writing a book is a horrible, exhausting struggle, like a long bout of some painful illness. One would never undertake such a thing if one were not driven on by some demon whom one can neither resist nor understand.” ~ George Orwell.

On getting published (encouragement from Ban Breathnach, Eliot, Fitzgerald, Twain)

“I approach my work with a passionate intensity, acting as if its success depends entirely on me. “But once I’ve done my best, I try to let go as much as possible and have no expectations about how my work will be received by the world.” ~ Sarah Ban Breathnach.

“It’s never too late to be what you might have been.” ~ George Eliot.

“By the time a person has achieved years adequate for choosing a direction, the die is cast and the moment has long since passed which determined the future.” – Zelda Fitzgerald.

“Write without pay until somebody offers pay; if nobody offers within three years, sawing wood is what you were intended for.” ~  Mark Twain.

On being an author (writing quotes from Capote, Goldberg)

“I never read unpleasant things about myself.” ~ Truman Capote.

“Never demean yourself by talking back to a critic, never. Write those letters to the editor in your head, but don’t put them on paper.” ~ Truman Capote.

“We have to accept ourselves in order to write. Now none of us does that fully: few of us do it even halfway. Don’t wait for one hundred percent acceptance of yourself before you write, or even eight percent acceptance. Just write. The process of writing is an activity that teaches us about acceptance.” Natalie Goldberg in Wild Mind: Living the Writer’s Life.

8 ways NOT to be a writer from Julia Cameron

If writing quotes don’t motivate you, scare yourself into NOT doing things that wreck your dream of getting published. These tongue-in-cheek tips are from Julia Cameron, author of The Artist’s Way: A Spiritual Path to Higher Creativity.

Best Writing Quotes From Capote, King, Lamott, Orwell, and More
  1. “Write long emails to your friends, instead of writing your novel.”
  2. “Focus on how much is left, not how much is done.”
  3. “Compare your work to the masterworks of the great masters.”
  4. “Surround yourself with jealous, blocked, negative companions.”
  5. “Invite houseguests for an extended stay.”
  6. “Rather than make art, read about art.”
  7. “Answer the phone every time it rings.”
  8. “Let the fear of freelance health care costs drive you back to corporate life.”

“I have learned, as a rule of thumb,” said Julia Cameron, “never to ask whether you can do something. Say, instead, that you are doing it. Then fasten your seat belt. The most remarkable things follow.”

Do you want to be a writer? Read How to Stay Motivated to Keep Writing.

What’s your best or favorite quote about writing? Here’s mine: “Because how we spend our days is, of course, how we spend our lives.” ~ Annie Dillard.

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35 thoughts on “The Best Writing Quotes From Capote, King, Lamott, Orwell and More”

  1. Thanks for your comments! My favourite writing quote is about “using it up now” — don’t save your favourite scenes, characters, dialogues, or descriptions for sometime in the future. I can’t remember what famous author said that, but I actually apply it to my every day life, too.

  2. Hi Laurie,thanks for a good and inspiring collection of quotes.My personal favourite is E.W.White’s,”A writer who waits for ideal conditions under which to work will die without putting a word on paper.”

  3. There is no such thing as a perfect writer, if there were the writer would not know rejection and their every book would win a Pulitzer Prize. Never focus on the reward of writing, focus on your story and you will succeed.

  4. It has always been my dream to become a Famous Author, i have even come up with some great ideas for books and pursued those ideas even though some of them don’t turn out well. The only thing i cant find an answer to is if ill be able to live off being an author? Even if i could how do i get my book published? So if you can answer these concerns i’d most appreciate it.

  5. Perhaps you know the exact John Irving quote I’ve been struggling to remember or find again. (I believe it’s from Garp, but I could be wrong.) It’s something to the effect that a novel is a place to put all those odds and ends of meaningless experience so they make sense in art, if not life.

  6. I love this quote by E.B. White…

    “A writer who waits for ideal conditions under which to work will die without putting a word on paper,” said White, author of Charlotte’s Webb and Stuart Little.

    I love it because it applies not only to writing, but to many other aspects of life as well. You can wait around for perfect/ideal conditions, but the truth is those conditions never exist. So you just have take action and go for it.

  7. Thanks for your comments and information! I’m tempted to Katie’s info from Gartner in its own article – it’s got some fantastic tips and quotes. And, he’s a successful writer.

  8. Michael M. Griffin

    Actually, my favorite quotation is the very first!
    “I don’t do housework. Life is too short and I’m too much of a Puritan. If you want to take a year off to write a book, you have to take that year, or the year will take you by the hair and pull you toward the grave.”
    Small things like housework will never equal a finished novel.

  9. I agree with what Walt Whitman said. I write things on the spur of the moment. I often jot things down on scraps of paper as ideas come to me. I do my best writing while I am not at my desk. I take notes while I am out and about and finish it up when I get home. You catch life as it happens that way.

  10. Michael Gartner, legendary writer, gave a speech about fun writing at the writer’s workshop a few years ago. He laid out the writing technique in 12 easy steps.

    Step 1: Report. Gartner emphasizes that a good writer should never leave out facts, details, quotes, and descriptions. He basically said not to get too caught up in perfect writing and forget the important facts that people actually want to know.

    Step 2: Read. Read anything and everything he says. Read news articles, fiction, nonfiction, magazines, etc. Read anything you can and as much as possible. I myself have been slacking on this, I read for class but that’s about it. I don’t have time to read for fun or long news articles. I read to stay informed but that’s about it. I should definitely read more, that’s a good goal for this summer!

    Step 3: Listen. To be able to report the facts, details, quotes, and descriptions, you have to listen for them and remember them. There is often a story beyond simply what the interviewee is telling you, it’s in their emotion.

    Step 4: Simplify: Gartner told a story about when he was just out of college and Barney Kilgore told him “the easiest thing for a reader to do is quit reading.” He never forgot that advice and thought about it during every story. Keep the reader interested, don’t bore them or make the story too complicated to follow. I’ve also been told this information in my Com 165 class and I feel it keeps me on track when writing stories.

    Step 5: Collaborate. Create a good relationship with your editor and talk to them about anything you need help with. A good editor can turn you into a great writer. Having a bad editor could distract you from your work.

    Step 6: Trust. Gartner said it great, “trust means honesty and respect, openness and courtesy. You simply cannot work with someone you don’t trust.” You need trust with your coworkers and your editor. You are all working for the same goal, to put out a great newspaper or news program, so you must trust each other to accomplish that goal.

    Step 7: Experiment. Experimenting keeps you from becoming a hack. It also keeps your readers interested and reading. Go away from the ordinary. Don’t be afraid to try something new, true it might fail, but it also might flourish, you never know if you don’t take that chance. This is something I need to do more in my writing.

    Step 8: Talk. Talk to others about your stories, especially the lead and the ending, or simply talk to yourself. Saying a sentence out loud makes it easier to hear how it flows with the rest of the paragraph or article. A story should flow like a song, have a ‘cadence.’ It might look good on paper, but reading out loud could shine a whole new light on the piece.

    Step 9: Pounce. Don’t let a good quote slip by. Use the quote in the best way. Quotes can go in many places in an article, but a good reporter knows where they’ll have the most effect. To be able to recognize a good quote you have to go back to step 3, listen.

    Step 10: Love. You must love writing and love reporting! If you don’t, you will never be a good writer. Gartner said, “if you don’t love at least 20% of you job, then just quit, find something else.” You also must love facts and be curious about everything, even things that don’t seem important.

    Step 11: Care. Care kind of goes along the lines of love. If you don’t care about what you’re reporting on then it will probably show in your writing, and the readers won’t care if you don’t care. If you care about a story, even a crappy one, you can make it interesting. Find the hidden detail that can make your story shine.

    Step 12: Balance. This is the final step of being a good writer. At least in the newspaper business, you cannot be a good writer if you write unfair stories. If you write unfair stories it ruins your credibility and that of the newspaper. And you will most likely lose your job. There is a lot that goes into being a good writer, 12 steps exactly, but according to Gartner, “there is nothing more satisfying, nothing more fun.”

  11. There has never been a truer quote for any writer than this:

    “All writing problems are psychological problems. Blocks usually stem from the fear of being judged,” said Jong. “If you imagine the world listening, you’ll never write a line. That’s why privacy is so important. You should write first drafts as if they will never be shown to anyone.”

  12. Morgan @ Kissy Kissy Baby Clothes

    Gotta love the one about the first sentence; I do guest blogging to promote my blog about organic baby clothing, and I can totally relate to being stuck with the first sentence.

  13. I really enjoyed reading the various quotes in your post, ‘20 Writing Quotes From Famous Authors – From Hemingway to Jong”. I particularly like Ernest Hemingway; I have read quite a few of his books and I have also been fortunate enough to visit his home in Key West, Florida.

  14. Love the list. Favorite quote is “A writer who waits for ideal conditions under which to work will die without putting a word on paper,”. Very inspirational and true. Thanks.

  15. I absolutely liked this post. My favorite is ‘Let the grass die. I let almost all of my indoor plants die from neglect while I was writing the book. There are all kinds of ways to live. You can take your choice. You can keep a tidy house, and when St. Peter asks you what you did with your life, you can say, I kept a tidy house, I made my own cheese balls.’

    It really strikes a chord with me. Although I am not a fiction writer, writing is what I do to make a living. Very often I have to neglect housework so that I can finish my writing assignments on time. I never regret it, but my family isn’t always happy with that.

  16. Hi Laurie,thanks for a good and inspiring collection of quotes.My personal favourite is E.W.White’s,”A writer who waits for ideal conditions under which to work will die without putting a word on paper.”
    I think to be a good writer and to achieve ‘flow’ in your writing, you need to develop the quality of total absorption, so much so that you may become oblivious of your surrondings while engaged in the writing process.However it requires mental training and absolute devotion to your craft.
    My latest post: Why Should you Watch TV?

  17. Vidya Sury, Freelance Writer and Professional Blogger

    I enjoyed the list. My favorite is Mark Twain’s “Twenty years from now, you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. Thank you, Laurie.

  18. Thanks for the wonderful quotes about writing by famous authors. My favourite is by George Orwell.His magnum opus ‘Nineteen Eighty Four’validates the essence of the above quote.The novel is a tribute to his analytical skills and incisive imagination.He could predict accurately the hair raising realities of totalitarian regimes and expressed these through a powerful narrative.It speaks volumes about his greatness as a writer.

  19. Victoria Collins

    I found all of these tips to be helpful, and true. The one thing I struggle with is not the idea, not the story line, but “Is it good enough that someone else wants to read it?” It never seems to me, good enough.

  20. Thanks for this wonderful post. I always wanted to be a good writer since I was a child. I idolize many writers. I appreciate this post it would help me a lot.

  21. Laurie Pawlik-Kienlen

    Thanks for your comments!

    Pookie, writing skills may or may not be important in the blogosphere. Maybe search engine optimization and other web writing skills may be just as important, in terms of attracting traffic. But, these famous authors aren’t talking about blogging, they’re talking about how to become a writer. There’s a big difference!

    Rohit, I agree that it’s not a good idea to copy another writer’s style — whether they’re a famous author or not. I think it’s important to recognize what makes a particular writing style work, and then to let your own style bubble to the surface.

  22. I would personally recommend not to copy the style of anyone.. Create your own Blogging style so that you get reviews from other s and you stand out unique in the crowd.. There is no point in behaving like others..

  23. If your goal is to make money by blogging, practicing and perfecting your writing skills is crucial.In the bloggosphere quality content is gold.Excellent site and tips.

  24. Laurie Pawlik-Kienlen

    Thanks for your writing tip! I like your gravatar, of the baby reading the book — very cute. And yes, writers need to find that balance between writing and reading about writing. It’s important to learn from published authors how to write, but perhaps more important to practice writing.

  25. My own writing tip is common sense – simply write. We often think that reading is what we need to do in order to write our best but every task takes practice to be perfect at it.

    So my advice: stop reading and start spending your time writing. 🙂 Easier said than done, I know.

  26. Laurie Pawlik-Kienlen

    Thanks George and Crystal for responding to my “assignment” to pull a writing tip from John Irving’s last quip! I appreciate your thoughts — it’s a difficult quotation and I didn’t want to tackle it alone 🙂

    He could also be talking about the reader’s take on the writer’s experience. That is, the reader could translate my words differently than I intended, or translate my experiences differently than I expressed…which often happens in writing, I think. As readers, we may infer things that the writer never intended.

    I wonder what John Irving would say about his writing quip….
    .-= Laurie Pawlik-Kienlen´s last blog post ..51 Over-Used Adverbs, Nouns, and Clichés in Writing =-.

  27. I believe John Irving is speaking about creativity. Two people may start out with the same experience, but the beauty of the translation is how they make it their own.

    I am a real writer. At first I found this a difficult statement, because when I would joyfully announce that I was a writer, the first question I would receive was always – “What have you published?” When I would say nothing yet, I would receive the look of doubt that screamed, “Yeah right”. I’ve since found it’s all about what I believe that matters.

  28. Hi Laurie,

    The word “translation” here in my mind means putting your thoughts through the filter that is your writing voice.

    Wonderful quips, Laurie.

    George
    .-= George Angus´s last blog post ..Kindle Thoughts – A Writer’s Perspective =-.

  29. Yes, sticking with the positive is good. Normally I do, but with my writing — before it’s published — I’d rather hear how I can make it better. After it’s published, it’s too late….keep your criticisms to yourself!

    Maybe that’s partly what Truman Capote meant about not reading reviews. At that point, it doesn’t matter what people think because it’s already published.

  30. Laurie,

    Stick with the positive I say. Ignoring the negative stuff is a great step to take. I’m not saying that I don’t need improvement – I know I do. I’m just not too interested in someone else’s opinion in that regard – I mean unless someone I really respect has something to say that could save me years of heartache and frustration.

    George
    .-= Tumblemoose´s last blog post ..Books on Fire, Now it Just Takes a Keystroke =-.

  31. Well, thank you very much, Daily Reviewer! Looks like I have some badges to collect and paste on my blog… 🙂
    .-= Laurie PK´s last blog post ..10 Tips for Interviewing Sources for Articles =-.

  32. Congratulations! Our selection committee compiled an exclusive list of the Top 100 Freelance Writing Blogs, and yours was included!

    Cheers!

    Ted…