The Best Books for Women Trying to Get Pregnant


books about getting pregnantWe haven’t been able to get pregnant for three years, and thus I’ve been reading tons of books about infertility, getting pregnant, fertility clinics, and assisted reproduction!

Here are a few of my favorites – starting with the most recent book I’ve read about getting pregnant.

“Most women ask themselves at one time or another what it means to mother – what the cost might be to their careers or marriages, how it reshapes the self,” writes Peggy Orenstein in Waiting for Daisy. “And all of us, male and female, encounter pain and loss; all of us reckon with dreams unfulfilled, with the limits our younger choices have placed on our later lives. All of us have to figure out how to move beyond that regret.”

I read Orenstein’s book – Waiting for Daisy: A Tale of Two Continents, Three Religions, Five Infertility Doctors, an Oscar, an Atomic Bomb, a Romantic Night, and One Woman’s Quest to Become a Mother in one day. It’s not a “how to get pregnant” book; it describes her in vitro fertilizations, pregnancies, miscarriages, attempts to adopt, and eventually having her daughter. It’s a fascinating book that describes her psyche, marriage, and determination to get and stay pregnant.

And, here are several of my favorite books about getting pregnant…

Books About Fertility and Getting Pregnant

Have you been trying to get pregnant for a long time? Read Signs of Fertility Problems in Women.

The Fertility Diet: Groundbreaking Research Reveals Natural Ways to Boost Ovulation and Improve Your Chances of Getting Pregnant describes how your diet and lifestyle affects fertility, and discusses natural ways to improve ovulation. The Fertility Diet offers lots of research evidence about nutrition – such as how soy affects infertility – and says that weight loss, diet, and medications are the key factors in getting pregnant.

Riding the Infertility Roller Coaster: A Guide to Educate And Inspire is written by a medical social worker, and is a great book for friends and family members of couples coping with infertility. This book describes infertility in legal, financial, medical, and emotional terms – and provides a well-rounded perspective of fertility struggles.

The author of The Infertility Roller Coaster – Iris Waichler – contributed 5 Ways to Cope With Infertility, here on Quips & Tips.

Hannah’s Hope: Seeking God’s Heart in the Midst of Infertility, Miscarriage, and Adoption Loss is a wonderful read about how infertility affects us spiritually and emotionally. Author Jennifer Saake describes how faith and the inability to get pregnant (“barren” wombs) are interwoven and shares how she tried to conceive a baby — and eventually adopted. This book about infertility is based on the Christian Bible, and can increase your faith and connection with God or a Higher Power. It did for me!

What to Do When You Can’t Get Pregnant: The Complete Guide to All the Technologies for Couples Facing Fertility Problems describes several different ways to start a family, from in vitro fertilization to egg donors and surrogates to ovulation prediction. And, this infertility book also discusses maintaining a strong connection to your spouse (marital friction can make infertility much harder to bear!). Written by a woman (Jennifer Hanin) who couldn’t get pregnant and a fertility doctor (Daniel Potter), this book combines personal knowledge with medical facts.



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Taking Charge of Your Fertility: The Definitive Guide to Natural Birth Control, Pregnancy Achievement, and Reproductive Health is the mother of all infertility books! It covers everything from testing your cervical fluid to examples of how to chart your temperature to predict ovulation. You’ll learn everything you need to know about the female reproductive cycle…and then some. A friend of lent this book to me when we were first trying to get pregnant. Unfortunately, it doesn’t offer a cure for infertility — just options for when you can’t get pregnant.

If you have any thoughts about these books about infertility — or if you have a book to recommend! — please comment below. 


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6 thoughts on “The Best Books for Women Trying to Get Pregnant

  • Rickie Hessian

    If you are overweight or underweight, you are probably decreasing your chances of getting pregnant fast. So getting into shape might help you in conceiving. If you are overweight, try to lose some weight, but in a slow and steady way. Crash diets may leave your body deficient in nutrients, which may further act as a barrier in getting pregnant. Talk to a reputed dietician or your doctor for reduction of weight in a safer way that will only promote your body to become suitable for the process. Also underweight women fail to get pregnant easily so gain some flesh before trying.

  • Laurie Post author

    Dear Laura,

    Thank you for sharing the good news! It’s so great to hear from women who had trouble getting pregnant, and who actually conceived a baby and are now mothers. That’s awesome.

    The Infertility Cure is one of the most popular books on getting pregnant, and I’m glad it helped you.

    Blessings,
    Laurie

  • Laura

    I was tested to be post mentalposal at age 16. My mom was a nurse and took me to specialist, and they told me I would never be able to conceive. My fsh levels were extremly high. I was devasted as all I ever wanted to be was a mother. When I did get married, my husband and went to specialist with my testing. Again, they told me I would never conceive, that may fsh levels were way to high. They told me invitro was my only chance. We didn’t have the money for invitro. I went on line searching for anything and everything on infertility. I discovered a book called The Infertility Cure, it was completely different from any of the books I read. It was a book about a doctor who was also having trouble conceiving. She found fertility in Western medicine and acupuncture. As it was hard for her to except, because everything she was taught. As I know it will be for you too. I was moved by her story, I wanted to go see her at her clinic in Texas. My husband said that it would be hard to found a acupuncturist in our area. I found Ethan Fisher who is located in Pocatello ID. I told him all the information I had that doctors told me.He said I would like you to read a book called The Infertility Cure. I told him I already read it, that why I’m calking you! 🙂 I made appointment and seen Ethan for a little over a year. My fsh levels dropped and I started getting periods, which I never had. On Feburary 3 2008 I found out I was pregnant.:-) Today we have a healthy 3 year old daughter.:-) Please if you are still trying to conceive, look in to acupuncture it can help you conceive the natural way. 🙂

  • Nerida Walker

    I wanted to let you know about my ministry New Life Ministries – bringing life to barrenness. We have seen many miracles and answers to prayer. This web site contains scriptures, support, testimonies and hope to those struggling with infertility. I also have a book called God’s Plan for Pregnancy where I share my personal journey on how my husband, Shaun was diagnosed as sterile but through discovering the truth in God;s Word we had 4 children in 4 years! For more information visit: www,godsplanforpregnancy.com. I also wanted to let you know of another site that you might find helpful. Hannahs Victory. This web site reveals God’s redemption and grace revealed through the story of Hannah. http://www.hannahsvictory.com. I pray these sites will reach those who need hope and encouragement in their journey.

  • Nick Montez

    Ever since I helped my my friend with infertility research, I’ve been obsessed with learning more about this subject. My friend actually found a an infertility guru and she helped her have a baby witin two years.

    If you go to cureforinfertility.weebly you can learn more.

  • Kathleen A. Ryan

    My husband and I tried for over four years to conceive…cycles of Clomid, Pergonal, Metrodin, inseminations, IVF attempts; tests, exploratory surgeries, you name it. I learned the root of the problem by catching a news segment one night, and ironically the focus of the piece was about the possible development of the male pill. Turned out that 10 couples attempting IVF weren’t getting embryos (like my husband and I)…I spoke with the research biologist who was interviewed for the piece, who figured out the problem, which is not widely written about or discussed. It was the men’s high blood pressure medicine (calcium channel blockers, not the beta blockers), which rendered the sperm incapable of fertilizing an egg (Yet, in testing, the sperm will appear normal, except for the hamster egg test, when you learn the sperm doesn’t penetrate the egg, which leads to an IVF attempt to put a hole in the egg, hoping the sperm finds its way in). I was on fertility drugs and my husband was basically on birth control! We were very lucky, and the third IVF attempt was successful (the first two didn’t even produce an embryo, even with ICSI). Here’s an article explaining Dr. Benoff’s findings, which includes the drug maker’s resistance to let the public know about the “side effect” of the blood pressure medicine: http://www.malecontraceptives.org/methods/nifedipine.php
    I hope this information may help some couples out there. I know the pain and heartache involved with the infertility roller coaster. I remember how depressed I was when I had to write the YEAR on my temperature chart. Best wishes…