10 Ways to Be More Positive at Work


Do you dread going to work? Check out these ways to be more positive at work. They range from digging up your latest, greatest accomplishments to taking pride in your appearance.

Before the tips, a quip:

“People with clear, written goals accomplish far more in a shorter period of time than people without them could ever imagine,” says motivational speaker and author Brian Tracy.





One way to achieve your career goals is to create a vision board, or pin a list of your goals on your bulletin board, bedroom mirror, and on your fridge. The more often you see your career goals, the more likely you’ll achieve them. And if you’re achieving goals, your work won’t suck so much.

Prioritize your to do list

Yes, you have a million things to do and a hundred clients to please and at least one difficult boss to placate, and everybody’s screaming “Give me attention now!!” To be happier in your workplace, prioritize your tasks from the most to least important. This doesn’t mean you have to do the most important tasks first; in fact, taking care of the smaller ones, such as filing or watering the plants, can be an excellent way to take a break from your more stressful job responsibilities.

Learn what being “positive at work” means

Being positive is a characteristic of a good employee that may seem obvious or boring, but it’s so important. Negativity drains energy, makes it difficult to negotiate conflict at work, and decreases your job performance. Avoid slandering difficult coworkers or gossiping about your supervisors. Be slow to criticize your clients, employees, or couriers – whether it’s to their faces or behind their backs.

Polish your job skills

If your biggest qualification for your job is that you’ve been doing it for ten years, consider taking a refresher job training course. Adult education classes or night school is a great way to become eligible for a new job and help you achieve your career goals. Added bonuses: you can network with other professionals, learn great career tips, suss out new job opportunities, and improve your self-confidence at work.

Sharpen your networking skills, so you’re ready to find a new job if need be

If you’re planning to stay with your employer, learning how to negotiate a raise, or looking for a new job, keep networking. You’ll learn valuable information, both professionally and personally, if you stay connected to your colleagues and mentors. A valuable workplace tip that will make you and your employer happy is to help bring in new business.

If you don’t want to be more positive at work, read Should You Quit Your Job? Before Resigning From Work, Consider…

Dress professionally and formally

Take pride in your appearance; if you’re not into the current fashion, ask your partner or a salesperson to make sure you’re well dressed. Even if you’re in an entry level job in the service industry, make sure your hair, face and hands are neat and clean. Leaving the nose rings, lip rings and eyebrow rings at home may not improve your job performance, but it will increase your professional appearance – which will help you achieve your career goals.

Improve your work skills

An often overlooked but hugely appreciated characteristic of a good employee is getting to work, meetings, and workshops on time. If you can’t meet your deadlines, ask for support. Be reliable, consistent, and trustworthy. In other words, be the employee you’d be glad to hire, supervise, and promote.



Need encouragement?

Sign up for my free weekly Blossom Tips!

* indicates required



Take on responsibilities that interest and challenge you

To be more positive at work, you need to find things that challenge and motivate you. So, ask for responsibilities that inspire you! If you’re interested in your work, you’re more likely to do a good job – which can lead to more, and more interesting, job opportunities.

Think back to your latest, greatest accomplishments at work

When was the last time you accomplished something at work that you’re truly proud of? What was that project or task? If you haven’t accomplished anything you’re proud of, then maybe it’s time to go beyond finding responsibilities that challenge you! Maybe it’s time to consider a whole new career.

Want to find a new job? Learn who is hiring in your field

A valuable workplace tip is to know what’s going on in your industry. This doesn’t mean you have to “cross over” to another job or organization. If, for instance, you find out that Business B is hiring New Employee X, and the job description interests you but you don’t want to jump ship at your current job, find out if you can bring those tasks to your current position. One way to be a good employee is to reevaluate your job description to match the industry trends and client needs.

Stay as healthy as possible – because the healthier you are, the more positive you’ll be

Take care of yourself. Get plenty of sleep, eat nutritious food, and exercise regularly. Deal with mental, emotional, or spiritual issues; don’t ignore your problems. Happy, positive employees are balanced in most, if not all, areas of their lives.

If you’re truly tired of trying to be positive at work and you don’t want to find a new job, read The 4-Hour Workweek, Expanded and Updated. Work less! Enjoy life more!

For more tips, read How to Choose a New Career When You’re Over 40.

If you have any questions or thoughts on what to do when work sucks, please comment below…



What to Do Next...

1. Stay connected! Sign up for my weekly "She Blossoms" emails.

2. Meet kindred spirits by joining our private "She Blossoms" Facebook Group.

3. Take advantage of free relationship advice from marriage coach Mort Fertel. He also offers "7 Steps to Fixing Your Marriage" - no strings attached.









Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

4 thoughts on “10 Ways to Be More Positive at Work

  • Laurie Pawlik-Kienlen Post author

    Angel, I’m sorry I missed your comment — I was away when you posted it, and just now found it! If you’re still around, let me know how things are going at work…I’d love to know how you’re doing and if there’s any feedback I can give you, that might help!

    Laurie

  • angel

    when i start working in a small company, it’s really difficult for me to adjust cause system are not fair enough expecially for new comers. as i start, no orientation and i didnt even feel i was welcome… so i rather stay silent until i look introvert. but my position is training for a supervisory level…i dont have any problem talking with my boss… but the over all supervisor, i feel like shes a jealous person, she threatened to be replaced in her position..even i dont have any intention to do that.. but judge me right away and she entertain gossip. and she tolerate employees to gossip especially about me… i really want to resign and find a better company…. or you think there still way how to deal that kind of person…HR is not that powerful….HR is also new comer…

  • Laurie Pawlik-Kienlen Post author

    Well, Mallory, you’re reading the right article! Figuring out ways to improve your job performance will not only make you a better employee, it’ll also increase your confidence for that employee review.

    One thing I’d add to the above list is to adapt to change (I can’t believe I left it out — it’s a great way to improve your job performance). Your new boss may change things all around, and if you want to keep your job and be happy in it, then you need to go with the flow. Focus on the positive changes; I’m sure there at least a few!

    At the same time, you can start putting feelers out for a new job. I don’t know what the job market is like in your field, but it’s pretty easy to find out if there are openings at places you’d like to work. Just call and ask! And, talk to people in your field.

    Good luck with whatever you decide to do, feel free to come back anytime with questions about work or anything else,

    Laurie

  • Mallory

    My job has been terrible for the past 2 months! My new boss doesn’t understand the way things work, and he keeps asking me to do things I never had to before — like revise the minutes from the meetings and write emails to people I never had to correspond with before. He keeps dropping hints about “improving my job performance” and talks about a employee review next month.

    What should I do? I just want to quit and find a new job.

    Mal.