7 Money Management Tips for Teens


These money management tips for teenagers are from Randy Loren – a financial advisor, author, and speaker who specializes in teaching teens about budgets, investing, and saving money.

“As a teenager you are at the last stage in your life when you are happy to hear that the phone is for you.” – Fran Lebowitz.

I’ve never been big on answering the phone — teen or not. But another very cool thing about teenagers is that they’re on the brink of being wildly financially successful, because they’re starting fresh with money! Teens have no debt history to deal with; they just have a bright clean future. Right? For more money info for teens, click on Loren’s book – Climbing the Money Mountain: The Young Adult’s Guide to Reaching Your Financial Peak.





And, here are his seven money management tips for teens…

The biggest mistake teens make about money is wanting instant gratification. Teens want money now, and seem to care less about waiting until supply economics drives the cost down. Take the new iPod phone: it was originally $499 when it came out; now, you can get the phone at ATT for $99. Teens need to begin to balance saving and spending money, because most teens only know about spending it. They have little or no training on saving money for their future or for a rainy day.  

7 Money Management Tips for Teens

1. Get your money growing. If you start saving a little each month, your money will grow and grow and grow. The Motley Fool website has an instant calculator that shows how much your savings will be worth over time. Begin saving when you young, with an IRA, Roth IRA, or other type of investment. Let years of compound interest make you wealthy and well prepared for the future.

2. Defer material wants. You don’t always have to be the first to own something new! Wait a little while until the excitement subsides, and then determine if you really wanted it in the first place. A huge money management tip for teens is that we often spend money on stuff, only to realize later that it wasn’t important.

3. Learn to budget. Make a budget to understand and see where your money goes each month. Budget is not a four-letter word. Done well, it is a practice that will enable you to be creative and flexible with your money. It will show you how to decrease financial stress, afford big-ticket items, and make the most of your earnings. Ask a parent for help with this.

4. Invest in your future earning power. Get a good education, because the more education you have, the more skills you process, and the more money you will make, and the less likely you will be unemployed when recessions hits.

5. Start a bank account. Find a no-fee bank in your area. Go with your parent to open up a savings account (with an ATM card) or a checking account (with a debit card). Learn how to record deposits and withdrawals, use the ATM, write checks, use the debit card, and balance your monthly account. At the very least, get a savings account and an ATM card so you’ll have your own gas money.

6. Be a smart consumer. Here’s a money management tip for teens that many adults don’t know: Learn how to negotiate for a better price on goods and services, and how to comparison shop. You can stretch a dollar by being a smart shopper–buying used or factory refurbished items, getting “off” brands, waiting for sales, asking for scratch and dent specials, etc.



Sign up for my free weekly "She Blossoms" newsletter

One Blossom Tip a week. Short and sweet. You'll love it.

* indicates required



7. Be a goal setter — and keeper. The main reason adults get into financial troubles – such as too much debt, no retirement money, no insurance — is because they failed to set and keep their financial goals. Work with a counselor or parent to set career, salary, and lifestyle goals — and then set stepping-stone goals that will help you succeed.

Need a job? Read 25 Odd Jobs and Hobbies That Make Money in Creative Ways.

Do you have any money management tips for teens – or any questions? Comment below!

Randy Loren is motivational speaker in South Florida, who educates high school students about financial literacy and sound money and work practices.







Laurie's "She Blossoms" Books

growing forward book laurie pawlik she blossoms
Growing Forward When You Can't Go Back offers hope, encouragement, and strength for women walking through loss. My Blossom Tips are fresh and practical - they stem from my own experiences with a schizophrenic mother, foster homes, a devastating family estrangement, and infertility.








letting go book laurie pawlik she blossoms

How to Let Go of Someone You Love: Powerful Secrets (and Practical Tips!) for Healing Your Heart is filled with comforting and healthy breakup advice. The Blossom Tips will help you loosen unhealthy attachments to the past, seal your heart with peace, and move forward with joy.









miss him book laurie pawlik she blossoms
When You Miss Him Like Crazy: 25 Lessons to Move You From Broken to Blossoming After a Breakup will help you refocus your life, re-create yourself, and start living fully again! Your spirit will rise and you'll blossom into who you were created to be.







xo


Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

4 thoughts on “7 Money Management Tips for Teens

  • Laurie Post author

    One of the best money management tips for teens I’ve ever heard is finding the balance between saving, investing, spending, and giving to charity. As a teen, I saved saved saved every cent I earned…I never enjoyed my money! And now as an adult, I can’t spend $6 without worrying I’ll go broke. And I have lots of money!

    As a teen, I wish I was taught to enjoy my money more.

  • CPACampus

    Teens, before entering college, should be able to have a basic knowledge in managing their money/income/allowance and how to be productive and let a bit of money coming in for them.

  • EdH

    I think all teens planning to go to college should take a financial literacy course – there are plenty of free, third party sites out there that can help here. They need to understand the impact of loans, oompound interest, and how to handle expenses (and minimize them).